Crushing it

Things that went through my mind in the process of composing this week’s blog post:

  1. To Partner: “We need more of those crushable baking potato chips that are not potato chips…”
  2. Hey, there is an entire site devoted to logging prior weather in the U.S.! Someone anticipated the deep-seated need of the ADHD community for a site to fact check them when they write, “Even though it seems hard to believe when we hit the 70s this week, we were in the 20s just last week” and they can’t perceive time well enough to remember if it really was “just last week” – or only felt like it.
  3. Good. My Partner added bread crumbs to our order.
  4. That historical weather site was probably intended for historical fiction. Solipsism is great in theory, but the idea that my mind shapes all of reality falls apart immediately upon being reminded that there is (still) no site to determine the actual word I am looking for from the random descriptions of my ADHD/brain-fogged mind. If the Internet were built around me, there would be. Ipso facto, my mind is not the only one that exists.
  5. To Partner: “You are right that if we order bread crumbs instead of making them, then they are not ‘crushable’ but ‘already crushed.’ Isn’t tense relative to the frame of reference though? By the frame of reference of the bread crumbs, the description is ‘already crushed.’ Potato chips don’t come pre-crushed. So, didn’t I use the correct tense for their frame of reference?”
  6. The moment an AI can obtain ‘bread crumbs’ from ‘crushable baking potato chips that are not potato chips’ – regardless of tense – is probably the moment we achieve the Singularity.
  7. This list of random thoughts is about to be longer than the rest of the blog post.
  8. This is also why my Partner and I crush games like Taboo and Heads Up. Maybe I should just go with that and make this post about how effective communication in relationships becomes even more convoluted with brain fog?
  9. I should still explain why I was originally looking up the weather last week to fact check myself, even though it seems kind of anti-climactic now to state that chronic illness and ADHD can lead to word-finding difficulties when I’ve clearly shown it.
  10. Wait, my original example works just as well as an example of effective communication with chronic illness! I can just relay the original conversation from last week’s cold snap that was intended to become a polished blog post verbatim! Crushing it.

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Uh Oh, Spaghetti-Ohs!

You know what they say: if you’re stuck in bowl hole, don’t keep pigging digging.

I grabbed a few spoons – and I don’t mean of the good kind – and dug in this week. That’s the nature of executive dysfunction coupled with a tendency to dissociate.

I am not the best at self-care in general, and I am generally worse at it when I’m alone or dissociated. My Partner has left me in the awkward position of being alone in our apartment on the East Coast (well, alone except for our kitty*) twice this year.

The first time he didn’t leave because of an active crisis, and I was generally aware and present the entire time he was gone. Or, at least I was as aware and present as anyone with ADHD ever is. I have now entered into my second year living on the East Coast, but I haven’t quite gotten used to having to keep food on hand for Nor’easters in March. By the time my ADHD brain worked out we were having one the last time I was alone – which was, basically, as the snow was starting to fall – our grocery delivery service had already stopped deliveries. I had to resort to stock ups for the next three days from what I could find at the CVS on the way home from work.

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Rest in Pieces

Dearly Beloved,

We are gathered here today to pay testament to the life of Squishy. He was called Squishy, and he was ours, and he was our Squishy.

Squishy’s passing – though not unexpected with an expected lifespan for his kind of only a few months – still leaves a void in our life that will be hard to fill for the approximately two days Amazon Prime will take to mail a replacement.

Squishy.jpg

Loved ones, we must acknowledge that, with Squishy’s passing, we are naturally feeling heightened anxiety and restlessness. Such emotions are only natural during these trying times. We wonder, was there something we could have done? Was it somehow our fault? In truth, we must believe that Squishy never blamed us for cleaving so tightly. He never felt smothered or overwrought. Squishy desired only to transmit his peace and joy, and, in the end, he succeeded. He touched us all as we touched him.

Squishy, as we know, was tragically preceded in passing recently by his sibling Spinner. We must believe that they are together again in the world that lies beyond us all. May they both rest in pieces.

Spinner.jpg

Now, as we lay Squishy to final rest here in our Gladlock Repository, let us not rail against the injustice of his passing. His spirit will live on in others.

Squishy_Survivors.jpg

Squishy, though there may seem to be many like you, you were ours. Let us cradle you in our hearts forever. At the same time, let us take your surviving relatives into our hands and welcome them with the same fierce love with which we loved you.

Need a recap of anything I’m talking about in any post? Check out the Glossary of Terms.

 

Pets Suffer From PTSD, Too

It is almost July 4th, a day that lives in infamy for pets across America, and animal shelters and animal control agencies are gearing up to handle the holiday’s substantially higher rates of lost pets as a result. Be safe, pet owners, and make sure your doors and gates are securely locked before you leave for the festivities! Also, please give your cats and dogs a little extra TLC today!

Fireworks shouldn’t cause more than short-term anxiety and fear for most pets, but pets can also suffer from more severe mental health issues, including PTSD. Service dogs returning from tours of duty in Afghanistan show signs of combat-related PTSD, and domestic pets show “civilian” PTSD after natural disasters, abuse or abandonment. I first learned about pet PTSD when we adopted our own kitty. She had been severely abused and then abandoned before we got her.

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